This Non-Invasive Nerve Stimulation Device Could Reduce Ringing in the Ears

According to researchers, a non-invasive nerve stimulation device can help to reduce ringing in the ears, which is…
non-invasive stimulation device

According to researchers, a non-invasive nerve stimulation device can help to reduce ringing in the ears, which is also known as tinnitus. They also realized that therapeutic impacts can be sustained for about 12 months after treatment.

These findings could be of great help since millions of people suffer from tinnitus and it affects almost 15 percent of the population worldwide. The findings were published as the cover story of a journal known as Science Translational Medicine.

So far, the study is considered the largest and longest followed-up clinical trial conducted in the field of tinnitus. The study which carrier out with 326 participants, provided evidence as regards the efficacy, safety, and patient tolerability of bimodal neuromodulation for tinnitus treatment.

You can also read: Couple Allows Single Dad and Kids to Use Beach Home after Learning About their Confinement Story

Nearly 86 percent of treatment-compliant participants experienced an improvement in the severity of tinnitus symptoms after 12 weeks of treatment, with many experiencing sustained benefits 12 months after treatment.

I am truly proud of our company’s ability to perform such a large-scale randomized clinical trial in two countries. This study tracked the post-treatment therapeutic effects for 12 months, which is a first for the tinnitus field in evaluating the long-term outcomes of a medical device approach.

The outcomes are very exciting and I look forward to continuing our work to develop a bimodal neuromodulation treatment to help as many tinnitus sufferers as possible.

Hubert Lim, University of Minnesota Associate Professor

The non-invasive stimulation device used in the study was developed by Neuromod Devices and features wireless (Bluetooth®) headphones that of audio tones layered to the ear. It also features electrical stimulation pulses delivered to 32 electrodes on the tip of the tongue by a proprietary device trademarked as Tonguetip®.

Featured image source

Total
0
Shares
Related Posts