New Cornell Study Reveals How Air Pollution Laws May Have Saved Birds in American Skies

According to a new Cornell study, the air pollution laws adopted in the United States might have helped…
New Cornell study

According to a new Cornell study, the air pollution laws adopted in the United States might have helped to save birds. These air pollution laws have helped to tackle dirty air and these may have prevented the death of billions of birds for the past forty years.

These air pollution laws have also saved countless humans in the last forty years. They have also helped to preserve about 20% of birdlife in the U.S.

According to the study’s lead author, Ivan Rudik and Professor William Morgan, the new Cornell study reveals that the impacts of environmental laws have likely been underestimated. Reducing pollution has positive impacts in unexpected places and provides an additional policy lever for conservation efforts.

Ozone is natural gas but it can also be produced by car emissions, power plants, and factories. It has its benefits and disadvantages. A layer of ozone in the upper atmosphere prevents harmful ultraviolet rays from getting to the Earth. However, ground-level ozone is hazardous and is the main pollutant in smog.

You can also read: To Reduce Space Junk, Japan is Making a Wooden Satellite

The researchers utilized models that combined bird observations with ground-level pollution data and current regulations in order to examine the relationship between bird abundance and air pollution.

They also recorded monthly changes in air quality, regulation status, and bird populations for 3,214 U.S. counties for15 years. The team focused more on the NOx (nitrogen oxide) Budget Trading Program to protect human health by limiting summertime emissions of ozone precursors from large industrial sources.

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