Inflatable Floodgates in Venice save the City for a Second Time

Venice was recently in danger when a 4.6-foot tide got closer to its shores. All thanks to the…
Venice

Venice was recently in danger when a 4.6-foot tide got closer to its shores. All thanks to the inflatable floodgates in the city. This kind of tide would have flooded a large part of the city. It would have started from the cultural treasure of St. Mark’s Square, thanks to the intervention of an operational inflatable defense system.

This inflatable defense system was named after a biblical figure, Moses, who helped another source of pesky water. The inflatable floodgate, Moses, was built to stay at the Venice Lagoon’s bottom until it detects flood. The floodgate created a yellow rubber wall that repelled the water and protected the city.

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Since the rain season began northern Italy has received a good amount of rain and this floodgate has been very useful. It kept the Venice lagoon from experiencing flooding, and it has been used twice this month, October 3rd and October 22nd.

This inflatable defense system was designed in 1984 and was supposed to come into operation in 2011, however, the Mose project was hindered due to cost overruns and corruption, forcing the architects in charge of the project to leave it behind.

The project which was estimated to cost €6 billion was moved into hyperdrive when Venice witnessed its worst floods after 53 years, which led to $1.175 billion in estimated damages. This project is now scheduled to be completed in 2021 when the city would be protected from floods.

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