Genes from Algae and New Scientific Technique Help to Partially Restore Vision in Blind Man

With the use of genes from algae, scientists restored a man’s vision partially. The patient was able to…
genes from algae

With the use of genes from algae, scientists restored a man’s vision partially. The patient was able to count, locate, and identify things after this treatment.

This treatment is a new breakthrough in optognetic therapy. It helps to restore the vision of people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. Retinitis pigmentosa is the gradual degradation of photoreceptive cells in the eyes. The genes from algae have proved to be effective in this treatment.

Channelrhodopsin ChrimsonR is a protein usually discovered in light-sensitive algae.  This protein helps ions to move in and about the cell after its exposure to light. The use of this protein helps to discover new possible treatment for retinal gene therapy.

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The patient could see objects and other things with the Goggles. This doesn’t look like an advanced treatment, however, retinis pigmentosa, which is one of the commonest conditions that result in blindness is yet to have an approved therapy.

Optognetic therapy could be more futuristic if there are there are further developments in this field. Meanwhile, stem cell methods to help restore photoreceptors were pioneered in mice and also carried out in humans. Chavala at University of North Texas for Retinal Rehabilitation, showed how fibroblasts can restructure themselves in mice suffering from macular degeneration and photoreceptors in patients.

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