CRISPR-based Genome Editing System Permanently Destroys Cancer Cells

Some Tel Aviv University Researchers have revealed that the CRISPR genome editing system works great in treating metastatic…
CRISPR-based Genome Editing System Permanently Destroys Cancer Cells

Some Tel Aviv University Researchers have revealed that the CRISPR genome editing system works great in treating metastatic cancers; this is a great step to finding a cure for cancer.

In this week’s paper, a novel lipid nanoparticle-based delivery system, which targets cancer cells was demonstrated by the researchers—and co-author Prof. Dan Peer said the study is the first globally to prove that the CRISPR/Cas9 can be used effectively to treat cancer in a living animal.

Peer, the Head of the Laboratory of Precision Nanomedicine at the Shmunis School of Biomedicine and Cancer Research, and the VP for R&D said that:

It must be emphasized that this is not chemotherapy. There are no side effects, and a cancer cell treated in this way will never become active again. The CRISPR genome editing technology, capable of identifying and altering any genetic segment, has revolutionized our ability to disrupt, repair or even replace genes in a personalized manner.

Peer

The researchers revealed that just one treatment with CRISPR-LNPs doubled the the life expectancy of mice having glioblastoma tumors, thereby improving their survival rate by about 30%.

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In an interview with Tel Aviv University, Peer said:

Despite its extensive use in research, clinical implementation is still in its infancy because an effective delivery system is needed to safely and accurately deliver the CRISPR to its target cells. The delivery system we developed targets the DNA responsible for the cancer cells’ survival. This is an innovative treatment for aggressive cancers that have no effective treatments today.

Peer

The Israel Cancer Research Fund funded this study, and published this week in Science Advances.

The researchers have noted that by demonstrating its potential in treating two aggressive cancers, the technology makes way for countless new possibilities for treating other cancer types, and other rare genetic diseases and chronic viral diseases like AIDS.

It will probably take some time before the new treatment can be used in humans, but we are optimistic. The whole scene of molecular drugs that utilize messenger RNA (genetic messengers) is thriving—in fact, most COVID-19 vaccines currently under development are based on this principle. When we first spoke of treatments with mRNA twelve years ago, people thought it was science fiction. . . We are already negotiating with international corporations and foundations, aiming to bring the benefits of genetic editing to human patients.

Peer

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