A Canadian Ranger Drives 1,000 miles to Help Stranded American Family

Majority of women in modern times generally don’t like to think of themselves in distress. When there’s a…
A Canadian Ranger Drives 1,000 miles to Help Stranded American Family

Majority of women in modern times generally don’t like to think of themselves in distress. When there’s a problem, at times, the only thing to do is call for a knight in shining armor to save them. This also happened to an American woman, but this time, her knight happened to be a Canadian ranger.

Lynn Marchessault was behind the wheel of a pickup towing a large trailer as she and her two children headed to Alaska to join her husband at the military base where he currently serves.

Although Marchessault is used to tough situations being a former military, even after upgrading to studded snow tires, the Southerner wasn’t set for the snowy conditions, which seemed to worsen as they traveled further north.

Rather than bring any form of harm to herself and her children, Marchessault decided to pull off the road and bivouac at a highway lodge that had been set up to house temporary workers. Her husband, who got stranded as a result of COVID-19 protocols, couldn’t be of help to them, so Marchessault requested some help online.

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The message was spotted by the watchful eyes of Gary Bath, who lives with his wife, Selena, in Fort St. John, British Columbia. Though the trek was close to 1,700 kilometers (roughly 1,056 miles), he was determined to see this woman he’d never met and her kids to their destination.

In an interview with CBC News Bath said:

I didn’t care how far it was, I just knew they needed help and they had a few short days to hit the border before they were going to get in trouble.

Bath

Bath and his wife, their car loaded with provisions, met up with Marchessault and her family at the inn. Entrusting them to Bath’s care, Selena drove home, leaving Bath behind to perform his knight in shining armor chauffeuring duties.

With Bath as pilot, the rest of the trip was uneventful. Everyone in the car observed COVID-19 precautions and the group reached their destination at the Alaskan border near Beaver Creek in the Yukon in good spirits.

Bath revealed that though he was glad to be of help, he was really touched at the generous nature of others who came in along the way

Marchessault really showered praises on the Canadian ranger who came to save the day. “We are forever grateful to Gary and I’m thankful to his wife for bringing him up and loaning him out,” she said.

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